Fallacies
What is a fallacy?  It is an error in logic ... a place where someone has made a mistake in his/her thinking.  

We use The Fallacy Detective by Nathaniel Bluedorn and Hans Bluedorn to learn and apply fallacies to "the real world".  

Our goals when examining fallacies:
1.  Know how to spot bad reasoning.
2.  Put a higher value on good reasoning.
3.  Know how to avoid fallacies in your own reasoning.

The fallacies we will examine:
FALLACIES THAT AVOID THE QUESTION ...
1.  RED HERRING.  The person introduces an irrelevant point into an argument.  Someone may think (or may want us to think) it proves his/her side, but it really doesn't ...
2.  SPECIAL PLEADING.  When someone uses a double standard or argues for an UNJUSTIFIED EXCEPTION, he/she is committing the fallacy of Special Pleading.
3.  AD HOMINEM ATTACK.  A person ATTACKS his/her opponent's character or his motives for believing something INSTEAD of disproving his argument.
4.  GENETIC FALLACY.  A person condemns an argument because of WHERE it began, HOW it began, or WHO began it.
5.  TU QUOQUE.  Latin for "you, too."  Dismissing someone's viewpoint on an issue because he himself is inconsistent in that very thing.  For example, you condemn someone for drinking Pepsi, yet you drink it yourself.
6.  FAULTY APPEAL TO AUTHORITY.  Using someone as evidence who has no special knowledge in the area being discussed.  For example, just because someone has a high IQ, doesn't mean they have the authority to make judgments on homeschooling.
7.  APPEAL TO THE PEOPLE.  Claiming that our viewpoint is correct BECAUSE many other people agree with it.
8.  STRAW MAN.  Changing or exaggerating an opponent's position to make it easier to refute.  For example, your parent states,
"You have been playing too many video games lately."   You reply, "So, you think I should just throw away my $1,000 video game collection and sit up in my room practicing IQ tests all day?"  This is NOT what your parent said;  you are exaggerating  your parent's viewpoint.

FALLACIES THAT MAKE ASSUMPTIONS ...
1.  ASSUMPTIONS. 
2.  CIRCULAR REASONING.
3.  EQUIVOCATION.
4.  LOADED QUESTION.
5.  SLIPPERY SLOPE.
6.  PART-TO-WHOLE.
7.  WHOLE-TO-PART.
8.  EITHER-OR.

FALLACIES THAT ARE STATISTICAL ...
1.  HASTY GENERALIZATION. 
2.  WEAK ANALOGY.
3.  POST HOC ERGO PROPTER HOC.
4.  PROOF BY LACK OF EVIDENCE.

FALLACIES THAT USE PROPAGANDA ...
1.  APPEAL TO FEAR. 
2.  APPEAL TO PITY.
3.  BANDWAGON.
4.  EXIGENCY.
5.  REPETITION.
6.  TRANSFER.
7.  SNOB APPEAL.
8.  APPEAL TO TRADITION AND APPEAL TO HI-TECH.

PROJECT
1.  Read "Love is a Fallacy" by Max Shulman and watch the YouTube version.
2.  As a group (2-3 people), create a satirical video incorporating ten of your favorite fallacies (e.g. a political debate, a product commercial, etc.).
3.  Create a script for the video (should be in a script format).  Highlight each fallacy and explain WHY they are fallacious.
4. You will be graded on the quality of the script and video, as well as the fallacies used in the production.