CP English 11

WOODLAKE UNION HIGH SCHOOL

COURSE SYLLABUS

 

Course Title: College Prep (CP) English Literature

Grade Level: 11

Elective/Required: Elective course

Length/Credits: Two semesters; 3 units

Prerequisites: CP English 10

Course Number:

Teacher: Elizabeth J. Thompson

UC/A-G approved: yes

 

I.                   Course Description

                  English 12A is a comprehensive skill development course for high school                            seniors. This course will include instruction in critical thinking skills,                              speaking and listening skills, reading for comprehension skills, practical                                   writing, college writing and vocabulary development. 

 

II.                Instructional Materials

                  Students must come prepared, everyday, with paper and pencil/pen;                                    depending on the day, they are responsible for bringing the required                                   reading material that is being covered in class

 

Required text:

      1. American Literature (McDougal Littell)

 

Supplemental Text:

1.      The Bean Trees

2.      poetry handouts

 

III.             Course Outline

A.    1st Semester –

                        A chronological study of American Literature:

-Early American Writing

-American Romanticism

-Realism

-Naturalism

 

 

B.     2nd Semester

      Continued from 1st Semester:

-The Harlem Renaissance and Modernism

-Contemporary Literature

-Research

 

 

IV.             Benchmark Standards

A.    1st Semester

READING

1.0. WORD ANALYSIS, FLUENCY, AND SYSTEMATIC VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT: Students apply their knowledge of word origins both to determine the meaning of new words encountered in reading materials and to use those words accurately.

            1.3. discern the meaning and relationship between pairs of words encountered in   analogical statements (e.g., synonyms/antonyms, connotation/denotation)

 

2.0. READING COMPREHENSION (FOCUS ON INFORMATIONAL MATERIALS): Students read and understand grade-level-appropriate material. They analyze the organizational patterns, arguments, and positions advanced. The selections in Recommended Readings in Literature, Grades Nine through Twelve illustrate the quality and complexity of the materials to be read by students. In addition, by grade twelve, students read two million words annually on their own, including a wide variety of classic and contemporary literature, magazines, newspapers, and online information.

            2.1. analyze both the features and rhetorical devices of different types of public     documents (e.g., policy statements, speeches, debates, platforms) and how authors   use these features and devices

 

Comprehension and Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text:

            2.2. analyze how clarity is affected by the patterns of organization, hierarchical      structures, repetition of key ideas, syntax, and word choice in text

            2.4. make warranted and reasonable assertions about significant patterns, motifs,   and perspectives by using elements of text to defend and clarify interpretations

            2.5. analyze an author's implicit and explicit philosophical assumptions and             beliefs about a subject

Expository Critique:

            2.6. critique the power, validity, and truthfulness in the logic of arguments set        forth in public documents, their appeal to audiences both friendly and hostile, and        the extent to which they anticipate and address reader concerns and counterclaims    (e.g., appeal to reason, appeal to authority, appeal to pathos/emotion)

 

3.0. LITERARY RESPONSE AND ANALYSIS: Students read and respond to historically or culturally significant works of literature that reflect and enhance their studies of history and social science. They conduct in-depth analyses of recurrent themes. The selections in Recommended Readings in Literature, Grades Nine through Twelve illustrate the quality and complexity of the materials to be read by students.

Structural Features of Literature:

            3.1. analyze characteristics of sub-genres (e.g., satire, parody, allegory, pastoral)     that are used in poetry, prose, drama, novel, short story, essay, and other basic         genres

Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text:

            3.2. analyze how the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or   comment on life, using textual evidence to support the claims

            3.3. analyze how irony, tone, mood, style, and "sound" of language are to achieve specific rhetorical and/or aesthetic purposes

            3.4. analyze ways in which poets use imagery, personification, figures of speech,    and sounds to evoke readers' emotions

            3.5. Analyze recognized works of American literature representing a variety of       genres and traditions:

            a. Trace the development of American literature from the colonial period forward.

            b. Contrast the major periods, themes, styles, and trends and describe how works by members of different cultures relate to one another in each period.

            c. Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of    the historical period that shaped the characters, plots, and settings.

            3.6 Analyze the way in which authors through the centuries have used archetypes drawn from myth and tradition in literature, film, political speeches, and religious writings
            (e.g., how the archetypes of banishment from an ideal world may be used to          interpret Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth).

 

            3.7 Analyze recognized works of world literature from a variety of authors:

            a. Contrast the major literary forms, techniques, and characteristics of the major     literary periods (e.g., Homeric Greece, medieval, romantic, neoclassic, modern).

            b. Relate literary works and authors to the major themes and issues of their eras.

            c. Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of    the historical period that shaped the characters, plots, and, settings.

 

WRITING

1.0. WRITING STRATEGIES: Students write coherent and focused texts that convey a well-defined perspective and tightly-reasoned argument. Student writing demonstrates awareness of audience and purpose and use of the stages of the writing process, as needed.

Organization and Focus:

            1.1. demonstrate understanding of the elements of discourse (e.g., purpose,            speaker, audience, form) when completing narrative, expository, persuasive,   informational, or descriptive writing assignments

            1.2. use point of view, characterization, style (e.g., irony), and related elements      for specific rhetorical and aesthetic purposes

            1.3. structure ideas and arguments in a sustained, persuasive, and sophisticated      way and support them with precise and relevant examples

 

Revising and Evaluating Strategies:

            1.9. revise writing to highlight individual voice, improve the style and sentence      variety, and enhance subtlety of meaning and tone in ways that are consistent with          purpose, audience, and genre

 

 

 

B.     2nd Semester

READING

1.0. WORD ANALYSIS, FLUENCY, AND SYSTEMATIC VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT: Students apply their knowledge of word origins both to determine the meaning of new words encountered in reading materials and to use those words accurately.

            1.3. discern the meaning and relationship between pairs of words encountered in   analogical statements (e.g., synonyms/antonyms, connotation/denotation)

 

2.0. READING COMPREHENSION (FOCUS ON INFORMATIONAL MATERIALS): Students read and understand grade-level-appropriate material. They analyze the organizational patterns, arguments, and positions advanced. The selections in Recommended Readings in Literature, Grades Nine Through Twelve illustrate the quality and complexity of the materials to be read by students. In addition, by grade twelve, students read two million words annually on their own, including a wide variety of classic and contemporary literature, magazines, newspapers, and online information.

            2.1. analyze both the features and rhetorical devices of different types of public     documents (e.g., policy statements, speeches, debates, platforms) and how authors   use these features and devices

 

Comprehension and Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text:

            2.2. analyze how clarity is affected by the patterns of organization, hierarchical      structures, repetition of key ideas, syntax, and word choice in text

            2.4. make warranted and reasonable assertions about significant patterns, motifs,   and perspectives by using elements of text to defend and clarify interpretations

            2.5. analyze an author's implicit and explicit philosophical assumptions and             beliefs about a subject

Expository Critique:

            2.6. critique the power, validity, and truthfulness in the logic of arguments set        forth in public documents, their appeal to audiences both friendly and hostile, and        the extent to which they anticipate and address reader concerns and counterclaims    (e.g., appeal to reason, appeal to authority, appeal to pathos/emotion)

 

3.0. LITERARY RESPONSE AND ANALYSIS: Students read and respond to historically or culturally significant works of literature that reflect and enhance their studies of history and social science. They conduct in-depth analyses of recurrent themes. The selections in Recommended Readings in Literature, Grades Nine Through Twelve illustrate the quality and complexity of the materials to be read by students.

Structural Features of Literature:

            3.1. analyze characteristics of sub-genres (e.g., satire, parody, allegory, pastoral)     that are used in poetry, prose, drama, novel, short story, essay, and other basic         genres

Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text:

            3.2. analyze how the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or   comment on life, using textual evidence to support the claims

            3.3. analyze how irony, tone, mood, style, and "sound" of language are to achieve specific rhetorical and/or aesthetic purposes

            3.4. analyze ways in which poets use imagery, personification, figures of speech,    and sounds to evoke readers' emotions

            3.5. Analyze recognized works of American literature representing a variety of       genres and traditions:

            a. Trace the development of American literature from the colonial period forward.

            b. Contrast the major periods, themes, styles, and trends and describe how works by members of different cultures relate to one another in each period.

            c. Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of    the historical period that shaped the characters, plots, and settings.

            3.6 Analyze the way in which authors through the centuries have used archetypes drawn from myth and tradition in literature, film, political speeches, and religious writings
            (e.g., how the archetypes of banishment from an ideal world may be used to          interpret Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth).

 

            3.7 Analyze recognized works of world literature from a variety of authors:

            a. Contrast the major literary forms, techniques, and characteristics of the major     literary periods (e.g., Homeric Greece, medieval, romantic, neoclassic, modern).

            b. Relate literary works and authors to the major themes and issues of their eras.

            c. Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of    the historical period that shaped the characters, plots, and, settings.

 

WRITING

1.0. WRITING STRATEGIES: Students write coherent and focused texts that convey a well-defined perspective and tightly-reasoned argument. Student writing demonstrates awareness of audience and purpose and use of the stages of the writing process, as needed.

Organization and Focus:

            1.1. demonstrate understanding of the elements of discourse (e.g., purpose,            speaker, audience, form) when completing narrative, expository, persuasive,   informational, or descriptive writing assignments

            1.2. use point of view, characterization, style (e.g., irony), and related elements      for specific rhetorical and aesthetic purposes

            1.3. structure ideas and arguments in a sustained, persuasive, and sophisticated      way and support them with precise and relevant examples

 

Revising and Evaluating Strategies:

            1.9. revise writing to highlight individual voice, improve the style and sentence      variety, and enhance subtlety of meaning and tone in ways that are consistent with          purpose, audience, and genre

 

 

V.                Expected School-Wide Learning Results

 

A.    Effective Communicator

      Students will continue to polish their effective communicator skills             through reading, writing, and presenting.  All work should show that the   student is familiar and truly understands a text or literary concept covered    in class.  Students should be able to, in their own words, restate a concept,       provide a definition, and give an example of the material in question.  

 

B.     Effective Problem Solver

                  Student papers will show effective problem solver skills due to a                                         progressive development of proficiency in college-level                                                         analytical/interpretive writing forms.

 

C.    Group Contributor

                  Students will be expected to contribute to class discussions, participate                               in oral reading exercises, and deliver presentations.  Each activity will                          enhance their group contributor skills by effectively speaking about and/or                       explaining material to others.

 

D.    Responsible Citizen

      All work is expected on time.  This expectation will prepare students for     college by requiring them to understand the importance of a deadline and the delivery of respectable (college) work.

 

E.     Lifelong Learner

      All activities in this class are geared toward life long learning.  Reading,     writing, speaking, thinking, analyzing, interpreting, explaining, and             exploring ideas (in this case literature) are fundamental applications that       people utilize everyday.  Being able to sympathize and empathize with       others is a skill that must be learned and revisited throughout life.

 

VI.             Instructional Methods

      Explicit Direct Instruction (EDI)

 

VII.          Assessment and Evaluation

                  Written assessments are the core of CP English.  Other forms of                                          evaluation: written and multiple choice tests, oral presentations, and oral                             questioning will also be implemented in order to determine student                                  comprehension.

 

 

VIII.       Grading Policy

 

A – 90% - 100%

B – 80% -89%

C – 70% - 79%

D – 60% -69%

F – 0 – 59%

 

IX.             Conference Period

 

Time: 5th period

Phone number/extension: 564-3307 ext. 171

Email: ethompson@woodlakepublicschools.org

 

X.                Classroom Policies and Procedures

                  1. Plagiarism and/or cheating are not allowed under any circumstance!  .

                  2. Attendance is mandatory in order to fully participate in class.

                  3. All assignments must be done on time.

                  4. All students have a list of rules for my class.  These rules were given     on              the first day of school and expected to be returned the next day                                                 with a parent/guardian’s signature.